New Report on Economic Impact of NIH Research Helps Make Case for Increased Funding

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest biomedical research agency in the world committed to improving health by conducting and funding research. Significant cuts to the NIH budget in the President’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget and proposal for the remainder of FY2017 are of significant concern to patients and researchers, and threaten the pace of scientific discovery.

NIH has several initiatives focused on increasing understanding of rare diseases and the speed at which new treatments are developed. These include the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network, Office of Rare Diseases Research and Therapeutics for Rare and Neglected Diseases program as well as the Undiagnosed Diseases Network, which seeks to provide answers to patients with rare genetic diseases and the Clinical Center, which is the largest hospital dedicated to clinical research in the U.S.

Data in a new report illustrates that NIH research creates jobs across the country and helps make the case that funding should be increased, not decreased. According to United for Medical Research (UMR), research funded by NIH supported close to 380k jobs and $64.799 billion in economic activity in FY2016.

“NIH-funded research is an engine for economic and medical progress, making the drastic cuts to the NIH proposed in the President’s initial budget doubly dangerous. These cuts will stymie the jobs creation and economic activity happening today as a result of NIH-funded research and they will slow down or completely stall critical research on a range of diseases, including some of our most costly health problems…” stated UMR President Lizbet Boroughs.

You can find the impact of NIH funding in your state here. The one-pager on the need for increased funding for NIH and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from the Lobby Day during Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill is available here, and a video of the presentation on this topic by Sara Chang of Research!America during the Legislative Conference can be found here in the section entitled “Rare Disease Legislation in the Queue”.