Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill Engaged 600+ Advocates

Thank you to the 600+ rare disease patients, caregivers, researchers and other advocates who joined us for at least one event during Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC from Monday, February 27th, through Thursday, March 2nd.

The week began at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where the EveryLife Foundation’s Chief Advocacy and Science Policy Officer presented an update on our work to improve the state newborn screening system and create incentives to encourage biopharmaceutical companies to repurpose approved medicines for rare diseases.

That evening, we hosted a cocktail reception, screening of the documentary Up for Air, and panel discussion. Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) and Representative Jim McGovern (D-MA) made brief remarks.

Aproximately 350 advocates joined us for the Legislative Conference on Tuesday, which was livestreamed for the first time. Experts from Capitol Hill and patient advocacy organizations discussed what to expect from the new Congress and Trump Administration, how to build effective relationships with Members of Congress and staff, and key legislation. Video and presentations will be available on the Legislative Conference resource page.

Advocates began Lobby Day at breakfast with remarks by Dr. Janet Woodcock, Director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, as well as Representative Gus Bilirakis (R-FL) and former Representative Brian Baird (D-WA), who urged advocates to be brief, polite and persistent in their meetings with Members of Congress and staff.

328 rare disease advocates participated in 270 Lobby Day meetings, discussing the Rare Disease Congressional Caucus, healthcare reform, incentives for rare disease drug development and other key legislative topics.

On Wednesday evening, we hosted the annual Rare Artist Reception which featured winning entries from the 2016 contest and remarks from several of the artists.

The final event of the week was a Rare Disease Congressional Caucus briefing entitled, ” Advancing Rare Disease Treatments in the Era of Cures and Health Care Reform.” Caucus Co-Chair Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) welcomed advocates and Congressional staff. Video will be posted on the Caucus webpage within a few weeks.

Follow Rare Disease Legislative Advocates on Twitter and Facebook for news on upcoming events.

The EveryLife Foundation seeks your support to end the NIH/FDA hiring freeze

On January 23rd, President Trump instituted an immediate hiring freeze that would affect many federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Unfortunately, this freeze could significantly hamper research into rare disease treatments as well as the review and approval of new medicines. The EveryLife Foundation for Rare Diseases is asking patient organizations to sign-on to a letter describing the critical importance of the NIH and FDA along with their ability to hire new staff.

CLICK HERE to sign your organization on to the Foundation’s letter!

The Foundation is accepting signatures until Friday, February 24th, so sign on today! Your voice provides needed perspective on how the hiring freeze could harm rare disease patients. Share this action alert with your networks and on social media.

Kids v Cancer Creates Pediatric Cancer Legislative Yearbook for 2016

Kids v Cancer compiled a yearbook summarizing the achievements of pediatric cancer advocacy organizations in 2016 and outlining steps that pediatric cancer organizations plan to take in 2017. The Pediatric Cancer Legislative Yearbook 2016 is available here.

 

 

 

Learn More about 21st Century Cures Act Provisions on Cell and Gene Therapies in Free Webinar on February 2nd  

The Alliance for Regenerative Medicine (ARM) will host a free webinar on February 2nd at 1-2pm ET to provide an overview of the provisions of the 21st Century Cures Act concerning cell and gene therapies. The webinar will feature Michael Werner, Executive Director for ARM, as well as a representative from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Questions will be welcome.

According to ARM, the 21st Century Cures created a Regenerative Medicine/Advanced Therapy product designation, as well as regenerative medicine-specific language intended to optimize the FDA’s approval pathways for regenerative medicine products.
More information and a link to register is available HERE.

Learn More about 21st Century Cures Act in Two Free Webinars

As we noted in a news brief last month, the law firm of Hyman, Phelps & McNamara P.C. has featured several blogposts on different provisions of 21st Century Cures Act. They will host two free webinars this month to further examine the Act, which will be good opportunities for advocates to learn more and ask questions.

The first webinar, to be held on January 12th from 12-1:30pm (EST), will focus on the pharmaceutical and biologics provisions of the Act. The second, to be held on January 18th from 12-1:30 PM (EST), will focus on the device and combination products provisions.

You can learn more and register at http://www.fdalawblog.net/fda_law_blog_hyman_phelps/2016/12/21st-century-cures-act-hpm-to-offer-two-complimentary-webinars-on-topics-of-interest.html.

A Deep Dive on 21st Century Cures

We previously highlighted the provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act of greatest interest to the rare disease community, but there were many more in the 312 page legislation.

The FDA Law Blog, the official blog of the law firm of Hyman, Phelps & McNamara P.C., recently took a closer look at several sections of the Act.  For analysis of the provisions related to medicine, click HERE (part 1) and HERE (part 2). Analysis of the provisions related to medical devices can be found HERE and analysis of drug-device combination products (such as a surgical mesh with an antibiotic coating) can be found HERE.

We will share any analysis of the potential impact of the 21st Century Cures Act as we find it.

President Obama Signs Landmark 21st Century Cures Bill into Law

NEVER doubt that your voice as a rare disease advocate matters! President Obama just signed the 21st Century Cures Act into law, after it passed both the House and Senate with broad bipartisan support. This would not have been possible without advocates from EveryLife Foundation for Rare Diseases, Global Genes, National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc. (NORD) and many disease-specific organizations who called, emailed and met with Members of Congress in the past year and a half.

The 21st Century Cures Act includes:

  • $4.8 billion in new funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • $500 million in new funding for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  • Formally establishes the Precision Medicine and Cancer Moonshot initiatives
  • Reauthorization of the Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher program through 2020
  • Funding for the establishment of a national neurological disease surveillance system coordinated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
  • Improved biomarker qualification
  • Allowances for the FDA to recruit and retain additional specialized employees
  • Strengthened patient engagement at the FDA through the Patient Focused Impact Assessment Act
  • A regenerative medicine designation to allow such products to qualify for priority review and accelerated approval
  • Provisions to foster programs to improve mental health and deter substance abuse

These provisions and additional funding would boost our nation’s research capacity and help modernize the drug review and approval process at the FDA.

Delivering #CuresNow: Speaker Ryan Signs Bipartisan Game-Changing Medical Innovation Bill

Dec 8, 2016
Press Release
Bill Officially Heads to The White House to be Signed into Law

WASHINGTON, DC – Following the Senate’s passage of the 21st Century Cures Act on Wednesday by a vote of 94 to 5, the bill was sent today to Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) before moving to the White House for the president’s signature. The House passed the game-changing medical innovation bill on November 30, by a vote of 392 to 26. Both Speaker Ryan and Senate Pro Tempore Orrin Hatch (R-UT) officially signed the bill at this morning’s Enrollment Ceremony.


With Speaker Ryan’s signature, the bill now heads to the president’s desk.

“This effort has always been about the patients, and I’m so glad that we could have our friend, all-star Cures advocate Max with us today. Not letting rare disease hold him back, this pint-sized dynamo has been with us every step of the way on the #Path2Cures,” said Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI). “We look forward to seeing President Obama make #CuresNow law next week. As Max said today, ‘Cures is more than hope, it’s action.’ Next stop, the White House!”

For more information on the 21st Century Cures Act, click HERE.

Visit C-SPAN to view the signing ceremony.

’Cures’ Research Package Draws Strong Bipartisan Vote

Originally published in Roll Call:

The House Wednesday night approved, 392-26, a sweeping biomedical research package that also aims to overhaul the mental health system and make targeted changes to Medicare.

Representatives passed an earlier version of the legislation, known as 21st Century Cures, last year, only to see it get delayed in the Senate over disagreements on mandatory funding for the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration, among other things.

The revised measure is expected to have an easier path in the Senate this time, according to lobbyists and aides. The White House on Tuesday said it “strongly supports” the bill. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Chairman Lamar Alexander of Tennessee said the chamber would vote on the package early next week.

Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, the top Democrat on the HELP committee, said her colleagues are “getting very excited” about the bill.

“I think there’s been a lot of good changes made over the last 24 hours that makes me feel a lot more confident,” she said Wednesday.

One of the changes sought by Democrats and Republicans alike was to strike a provision related to federal disclosure requirements for physicians. The language in the updated bill would have exempted doctors from reporting certain compensation they received from pharmaceutical and medical device companies. That provision was dropped after opposition from Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, incoming Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York, and others.

Democrats were also able to add language that would direct money to combat opioid abuse to the states with the highest need.

Unlike the earlier bill, the House measure has no language protecting drugmakers’ patents for longer periods. And while the previous bill would have provided $8.75 billion in funding for the NIH over five years, updated language released last week would provide $4.8 billion over a decade for specified projects within the agency, including President Barack Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative and cancer “moonshot” program.

The new legislation would also provide $500 million over nine years for the FDA. It would also provide $1 billion to the states to help fight the opioid epidemic.

Offsets for the bill would come mainly from the federal Strategic Petroleum Reserve and a fund created in the 2010 health care overhaul to promote disease prevention and public health.

To accommodate the concerns of Republicans in both chambers, sponsors revised a funding mechanism so that dollars would be set aside in what are referred to as “innovation” funds. Appropriators would then need to approve withdrawals from those accounts each year.

The change was met with some backlash from Democrats in both chambers.

“This bill authorizes the NIH for a quarter of the funding that was in the original bill that was passed in the House last year,” Massachusetts Rep. Jim McGovern said during a Rules Committee hearing on Tuesday.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, on Monday, also blasted the Cures package as a giveaway to the pharmaceutical industry.

“When American voters say Congress is owned by big companies, this bill is exactly what they are talking about,” the Massachusetts Democrat said in a speech on the Senate floor. Senate Republicans have “let Big Pharma hijack the Cures bill. This final deal has only a tiny fig leaf of funding, for NIH and for the opioid crisis,” she said.

Patient-Advocacy Community Urges Congress to Move Forward with 21st Century Cures Legislation

Originally published on the National Health Council website:

Washington, DC (November 16, 2016) – More than 200 patient and research associations representing individuals affected by a broad range of diseases and disabilities sent a letter to Congressional leadership today, calling on them to pass the 21st Century Cures Act during the lame duck session.

The legislation, which passed the House in July 2015 with broad bipartisan support, is based on recommendations from the entire health community and will help ensure access to essential treatments.

“This is a patient-focused bill that will advance the discovery and development of treatments, strengthen the patient voice in the research and regulatory environment, increase funding for the National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration, and greatly improve our innovation ecosystem,” the letter said.

Millions of Americans are awaiting effective treatments and cures for chronic diseases or disabilities, and delaying passage of the legislation only makes the wait longer.

Click here to read the letter and see the list of organizations that signed on.